0

Goldfish Surgery: Goldfish Undergone Successful Tumor Surgery (Video)


Sponsored Links


A Goldfish name “George” was successfully undergone goldfish surgery last week to remove a tumor protruding from the fish’s head, how does this high-risk operation happen?

goldfish surgery, goldfish survive surgery, goldfish undergone surgery, goldfish tumor surgery, George the goldfish, goldfish george

Goldfish undergone successful tumor surgery. Image Credit: Lort Smith Animal Hospital

Some people starts to wonder if the goldfish surgery is really possible and most of them asking the veterinarian, “How you actually operate a Goldfish?”

The 10-year-old dying goldfish suffering from a head tumor resulting to affect his quality of life. George was unable to swim and eat properly, and was starting to “really suffer”, as stated by Dr. Tristan Rich.

To perform the life-threatening surgery, George the goldfish was admitted to Lort Smith Animal Hospital in North Melbourne last week.

goldfish surgery, goldfish survive surgery, goldfish undergone surgery, goldfish tumor surgery, George the goldfish, goldfish george

Goldfish undergone successful tumor surgery. Image Credit: Lort Smith Animal Hospital

On Lort Smith official Facebook account, the hospital explain the details of the operation. Below is the full text of the Goldfish tumor surgery story.

The goldfish surgery. How it happened!
Dr Tristan Rich yesterday performed surgery on much-loved goldfish George removing a tumour from his head.
Many of you asked how you actually operate on a fish.
Dr Tristan Rich, head of Lort Smith’s exotic and wildlife vet team, set up three buckets – one with a knock out dose of anaesthetic, one with a maintenance level of anaesthetic, and one with clean water as the recovery unit.
Once George was asleep, Dr Tristan ran a tube from the maintenance bucket which was being oxygenated, into George’s mouth, so that the water with the maintenance dose of anaesthetic washed over his gills.
Dr Tristan worked quickly to remove the large tumour, although the size of it meant that he had to use a gelatine sponge to control the bleeding during surgery. The size of the wound meant it was difficult to seal, so Dr Tristan put in four sutures then sealed the rest of the wound with tissue glue.
Once that had set, George was placed in the recovery unit and given oxygen. He was given injections with long acting pain relief and antibiotics. Soon afterwards he took a couple of breaths on his own and started swimming around.
Working with unusual pets and wildlife means that Dr Tristan has developed a lateral approach to creating effective theatre set ups and we are always amazed at the way he finds a way to help these little critters.

Watch the video below of Goldfish successful tumor surgery interview.

Video Credit:FairFox Media/The Sydney Morning Herald



Tags: , , , , ,

Leave a Reply




If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a Gravatar.

Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA.